Judge Orders Hospital to Allow Ivermectin–Dying Man Saved

Mary Beth Pfeiffer writes A Judge Stands up to a Hospital: “Step Aside” and Give a Dying Man Ivermectin  Excerpts in italics with my bolds

A Chicago-area judge saved a grandfather’s life with the single question that exposes hospitals blocking doctors from using a safe, FDA-approved drug: Why?

Sun Ng at Edward Hospital in Napierville, Illinois, where officials refused, until ordered by a court, to administer life-saving ivermectin for covid. (Photo by daughter Man Kwan Ng as submitted to the court.)

Sun Ng, a retired contractor from Hong Kong, traveled to Illinois to celebrate his only granddaughter’s first birthday. He got covid and was near death in a Chicago-area hospital. All other options were exhausted, but the hospital refused to give Mr. Ng a generic, FDA-approved drug with an extraordinary safety record that a doctor believed could safe his life.

Finally, a judge asked the right question about ivermectin.  “What’s the downside?”

Put another way: If a man is dying of covid in an ICU and all else has been tried, why not order a hospital to give a safe, last-ditch drug?

Edward Hospital, located near Chicago, offered three arguments as to why Sun Ng, seventy-one, should not be given ivermectin:

    • There could be side effects.
    • Ordering ivermectin would violate its policies.
    • Forcing the issue would be “extraordinary” judicial overreach.

On each argument, DuPage County Circuit Court Judge Paul Fullerton firmly disagreed.

“I can’t think of a more extraordinary situation than when we are talking about a man’s life,” he said in a November 5 decision that is a model of rational decision-making in an irrational era.

“I am not forcing this hospital to do anything other than to step aside,” he continued in a Zoom hearing. “I am just asking—or not asking—I am ordering through the Court’s power to allow Dr. Bain to have the emergency privileges and administer this medicine.”

The hospital ultimately stepped aside. Dr. Alan Bain, an internist, administered a five-day course of 24 milligrams of ivermectin, from November 8 through November 12.

Ng, who with his wife, Ying, had come from Hong Kong to celebrate their granddaughter’s birthday, was able to breathe without a ventilator within five days—he, in fact, removed the endotracheal himself. He left the ICU Tuesday, November 16, and, although confused and weak, was breathing Sunday without supplemental oxygen on a regular hospital floor.

“Every day after ivermectin, there was accelerated and stable improvement,” said Dr. Bain, who administered the drug in two previous court cases after hospitals refused. “Three times we’ve shown something,” he told me. “There’s a signal of benefit for ventilator patients.”

Ng’s remarkable progress stands in sharp relief to the repeated attempts by Edward-Elmhurst Health, the hospital’s managing system, to thwart the use of ivermectin. It succeeded in having the court’s initial November 1 order dismissed by claiming Ng was in better health than his lawsuit contended (he wasn’t). It then defied the November 5 order, saying Dr. Bain was not vaccinated (a negative test resolved the issue).

Moreover, after Ng’s treatment was complete, the hospital system filed notice that it would appeal the order that had already been carried out. It did this even though Sun Ng seemed to have benefited greatly.

The patient’s improvement, or condition generally, did not seem to matter.

The judge’s finest moment may have been when he dashed the most glaring myth about ivermectin—that it is not safe, despite decades of use that shows otherwise. Noting that all drugs have side effects, Judge Fullerton listed ivermectin’s effects from a government website.

“(N)umber one, generally well tolerated; number two, dizziness; number three, pruritus; number four, nausea/diarrhea. These are the side effects for the dosage that’s being asked to be administered,” he said.

“The risks of these side effects are so minimal that Mr. Ng’s current situation outweighs that risk by one-hundredfold.”

If he hadn’t yet made his position clear, the judge then addressed the statement by a hospital doctor who, the judge said, “testified that the risk is that there is no benefit.”

On the contrary, the judge said, “The possible benefit this Court sees is helping save Mr. Ng’s life with this drug.”

In an interview Sunday, Dr. Ng said her father is not out of the woods yet. But ivermectin made a clear difference, she said. Before given the medication, every attempt to wean her father even briefly from the respirator failed. Within eight hours on the medication, he was able to undergo a one-hour breathing trial. “I am positive,” she told me when I asked if she credits ivermectin.

While Dr. Bain was well aware of ivemectin’s ability to fight the covid virus in early infection, even he was surprised to discover its late-stage effectiveness. “It quells the fire of the inflammatory storm and also helps to lower the progression of stiffened lungs—aka pulmonary fibrosis,” he said. “That’s the beauty of this drug. I’m not saying it’s a cure. It’s just amazing.”

Sun Ng before, during, and after Ivermectin treatment

 

 

 

 

4 comments

  1. Ozonebust · December 6

    Dear Ron
    What a great story in difficult times.
    You have posted some great article’s, of high interest.
    Thank you.
    Martin

    Like

    • Ron Clutz · December 6

      Thanks Martin. Amazing that hospital administrators could be so blind and active against the wellbeing of their patients (clientele).

      Like

  2. Virtual Reality · December 7

    Click to access LockdownReport.pdf

    Covid Lockdown Cost/Benefits:
    A Critical Assessment of the Literature
    Douglas W. Allen* 
    April 2021

    ABSTRACT
    An examination of over 80 Covid-19 studies reveals that many relied on assumptions that were false, and which tended to over-estimate the benefits and underestimate the costs of lockdown. As a result, most of the early cost/benefit studies arrived at conclusions that were refuted later by data, and which rendered their cost/benefit findings incorrect. Research done over the past six months has shown that lockdowns have had, at best, a marginal effect on the number of Covid-19 deaths. Generally speaking, the ineffectiveness of lockdown stems from voluntary changes in behavior. Lockdown jurisdictions were not able to prevent noncompliance, and non-lockdown jurisdictions benefited from voluntary changes in behavior that mimicked lockdowns. The limited effectiveness of lockdowns explains why, after one year, the unconditional cumulative deaths per million, and the pattern of daily deaths per million, is not negatively correlated with the stringency of lockdown across countries. Using a cost/benefit method proposed by Professor Bryan Caplan, and using two extreme assumptions of lockdown effectiveness, the cost/benefit ratio of lockdowns in Canada, in terms of life-years saved, is between 3.6-282. That is, it is possible that lockdown will go down as one of the greatest peacetime policy failures in Canada’s history.

    * Department of Economics, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, Canada.
    Email: allen@sfu.ca
    ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
    Hi Ron
    I found this online and thought you might like to take a look at it. There are some graphs and numbers, as you would expect. I hate to say it, but the effects will continue for a few years! Economically and psychologically.

    Like

    • Virtual Reality · December 8

      Hi Ron

      This is the update (29th Sep 2021) to the article from above that is now available online under the following link. Thanks to Professor Allen for giving sending me this information.

      Covid Lockdown Cost/Benefits:
      A Critical Assessment of the Literature
      Douglas W. Allen* 
      September 29th 2021

      https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13571516.2021.1976051

      Like

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